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Featured articles
18.02.2021

Understanding and predicting how climate change impacts Svalbard ptarmigan population dynamics

Iterative near-term forecasting is a promising approach to better understand and manage rapidly changing ecosystems such as the Arctic. Forecasts generated on a short-term time scale allow scientific hypotheses to be tested more frequently, speeding up scientific advancement, and are relevant to managers because the time scale can be influenced by...

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27.11.2020

It is important to consider food web interactions when assessing how well mesopredator culling programs work

Management of endangered species by culling mesopredators is increasingly common. To what extent such programs work as intended, is less clear. In a new study , COAT researchers evaluated the impact of red fox culling on a threatened ptarmigan species.

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26.10.2020

New method: Chemical traits of single leaves using near‐infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS)

Measures of plant chemical traits are often achieved by merging several leaves, masking potential foliar variation within and among plant individuals. In a new study , COAT researchers developed a new application of Near-infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy (NIRS) methodology that provides measures of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and silicon from ...

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18.03.2020

The Arctic is greening, bird populations are declining: Is there a link?

Ecological theory predicts that increased productivity at the base of food chains may raise predation rates at intermediate levels. New research by the Climate-ecological Observatory for Arctic Tundra (COAT) finds a link between plant productivity in tundra landscapes and bird nest predation rates.

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17.12.2018

An uncertain future for the mountain birch forest

Outbreaks by geometrid moths have caused extensive damage to mountain birch forest in northern Scandinavia during the last 15 years. A new study helps to explain why the damage has been so severe and suggests that the forest may fail to recover in the most heavily affected areas.

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24.09.2018

Rodent-plant interactions are temporally variable

Rodent abundance during population peaks in the tundra is highly variable. In a new study COAT researchers attempted to use data from one peak to predict where the rodents would be most abundant during the next peak.

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06.02.2018

Goose density influences predation on ground-nesting birds in Svalbard

The number of geese that spend the summer in Svalbard has increased in recent years. Geese nest on the ground, where their eggs and chicks are easy prey for arctic foxes. If goose colonies attract foxes, how might that affect the survival of other birds that nest on the tundra?

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05.12.2017

Salvage logging of mountain birch after moth outbreaks

Outbreaks of defoliating geometrid moths have damaged thousands of square kilometres of mountain birch forest in northern Scandinavia during the last two decades. Salvage logging of damaged mountain birch stands has been discussed as a means of speeding up the regeneration of the forest.

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22.11.2017

Reindeer keep shrubs in a browse trap

In a recently published paper in Ecological Applications, COAT researchers Bråthen & Ravolainen and colleagues show how reindeer management controls the climate-sensitive tundra state transition from open tundra grasslands to shrublands.

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15.11.2017

Special issue on Arctic Fox Biology and Management

A special issue on Arctic Fox Biologi and Management is now out in Polar Research, Volume 36, 2017 with 5 papers from COAT researchers

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Complete publication list

from COAT: