GO
en-USnb-NO

COAT school is a research-based school program for use in primary and lower secondary schools created by COAT researchers in collaboration with educators. We want to offer a resource bank with ready-made teaching units of basic theory, with theoretical and practical tasks. The assignments in COAT school include the topics: Arctic ecology, climate changes and climate effects. Relevant local and regional examples from Northern Norway are used, which can make the subject intimate and exciting for the students. In addition, it is possible for COAT personnel to come and assist in the implementation of the unit. It is also possible to borrow equipment from COAT that the school may be missing in order to complete the program.

 

For whom is COAT school?

COAT school is intended as an inspiration for subject teachers in relevant subjects. The programs in COAT school can be used at different levels – but are perhaps most relevant for students in grade 5-7 and possibly the lower secondary school. The program fit well into the subject Science: Natural science practices and ways of thinking, Technology, Earth, and life on earth. Some current competence goals the programs in COAT school can help to achieve can be:

After grade 7:

  • Explore and describe different food webs and use this to discuss interactions in nature.
  • Ask questions and make hypotheses about scientific phenomena, identify variables and collect data to find answers.
  • Explain the importance of biological diversity and implement measures to preserve biological diversity and local environment.
  • Propose measures to preserve biological diversity in the high north and provide examples of the importance of traditional knowledge in nature management.
  • Distinguish between observations and conclusions, organize data, use cause-effect-arguments, draw conclusions, assess errors and present findings.

After grade 10:

  • Ask questions and make hypotheses about scientific phenomena, identify dependent and independent variables and collect data to find answers.
  • Analyze and use collected data to make explanations, discuss the explanations in the light of relevant theory and assess the quality of own and others` explorations.
  • Use and create models to predict or describe scientific processes and systems and account for the models` strengths and limitations.
  • Describe the greenhouse effect and explain factors that can cause global climate change.

 

How does COAT school work?

COAT school works like this:

  1. The teacher downloads the current program as a ready to use “teaching package” (compressed folder) from the links further down.
  2. The teacher follows the instructions on the PDF-file “How to carry out the plan” that is part of the “teaching package” and carries out the plan on his own.

Or:

  1. The teacher contacts one of COAT`s school contacts (see top right of this page) to arrange assistance from COAT staff to carry out the program or hear about the possibility of a school visit from COAT staff.

NB: Remember that it is possible to borrow the necessary equipment from COAT if the school does not have the necessary equipment. This is done by contacting one of COAT`s school contacts.   

 

Why COAT school?

COAT school wants to contribute to increased knowledge and awareness of climate change and its effect on the land ecosystems (northern forest, mountains and tundra) in the northern areas and with a focus on northern Norway. COAT school also wants to contribute to increased interest in Arctic ecology. COAT school tries to contribute to this through relevant local and regional examples from Northern Norway, which hopefully can make the subject more close and exciting for the students.

 

Here is two progrems ready for use in elementary School:

 

Den store vårspretten

Hva er sammenhengen mellom temperatur og vårutvikling

 

Se rovdyrene

Hvilke rovdyr finnes i nærområdet og hvorfor er det viktig å ha kunnskap om dem

School contacts

School contact Troms (and rest of Norway)
Advisor COAT, UiT - Arctic University of Norway
leif.e.stovern@uit.no
School contact Varanger (and rest of Finnmark)
Advisor COAT, UiT - Arctic University of Norway
jan.e.knutsen@uit.no

 

School children putting up camera trap as part of a COAT shcool program. Photo: Ingrid Jensvoll

Curious Arctic fox in Varanger. Photo: Geir Vie

Birchmoths eating tasty birch leaves. Photo: COAT

Bumblebees are an important pollinator. Photo: Illustration/NINA